BREAKING: Lac La Ronge Indian Band restricts access over COVID-19

BREAKING: Lac La Ronge Indian Band restricts access over COVID-19

Lac La Ronge Indian Band (LLRIB) passed an emergency measures bylaw on Monday morning limiting access to their territory in north-central Saskatchewan.

Council of the Lac La Ronge Indian Band drafted the bylaw at a meeting held on March 26, in La Ronge, Sask., and passed it remotely by quorum on Monday.

Lac La Ronge Indian Band Chief Tammy Cook-Searson told National Observer on Friday that the measure was under consideration in order to ensure the health and safety of the community and combat the spread of COVID-19.

“Just to have the local people in the community that can go in and out but not people that don’t live in that community,” Cook-Searson said.

There are currently no confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Lac La Ronge and the community hopes to keep it that way.

“The potential spread of the novel coronavirus causing the disease COVID-19 requires urgent measures be taken to protect the health of residents of Lac La Ronge Indian Band reserves,” the bylaw states.

Lac La Ronge is located near the Town of La Ronge and the Northern Village of Air Ronge. LLRIB jurisdictions extend from central Saskatchewan north beyond Churchill River. It’s the largest First Nation in the province with a 2018 population of approximately 11,079.

Sign for the Lac La Ronge First Nation reserve located between the Town of La Ronge and the Northern Village of Air Ronge. Photograph by Michael Bramadat-Willcock.

Non-residents must request permission to access LLRIB territory with at least 24 hours notice and the band manager will then decide if the request is for an approved purpose before informing non-residents and security of their decision.

If a non-resident gives less than 24 hours notice of their intention to access the reserve, security will decide whether the visit equates to an approved purpose. If a visit is not approved, LLRIB security is instructed to remove them immediately.

Citing the Indian Act, Council made the decision “for the purpose of providing for the health of residents on the reserve and preventing the spreading of contagious and infectious diseases” and authorizes “removal and punishment of persons trespassing on the reserve or frequenting the reserve for prohibited purposes.”

“We are dealing with an invisible enemy and every Saskatchewan resident, First Nations and non-First Nation, must do everything necessary to protect everyone within our region”” FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron

The bylaw will remain in force until either Council repeals it or until “the province of Saskatchewan declares that physical (social) distancing is no longer a necessary or recommended measure to deal with the COVID-19 virus.”

Other First Nations in Saskatchewan have taken similar measures. Peter Ballantyne Cree Nation enacted a lockdown on March 21. Until further notice access is restricted in: Southend/Reindeer Lake, Pelican Narrows, Deschambeault Lake, Sandy Bay and Denare Beach. Travel has also been banned to the Fond Du Lac Denesuline Nation since March 20th.

A state of emergency was announced and travel restricted to Cumberland House Cree Nation and the Northern Village of Cumberland House on March 23, with only permanent residents allowed in.

On March 21, the Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) asked that Premier Scott Moe close provincial borders to stop the spread of COVID-19.

“The traffic on our highways coming in and out of the provincial borders continues to put everyone in Saskatchewan at unnecessary risk,” FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron said in a news release.

“We are dealing with an invisible enemy and every Saskatchewan resident, First Nations and non-First Nation, must do everything necessary to protect everyone within our region,” Cameron said.

The Northern Inter-Tribal Health Authority (NITHA) reported that one person diagnosed with COVID-19 in Southend has recovered, and as of March 28, there were no further reported cases of COVID-19 on First Nations reserves in the province.

Access to LLRIB reserves by non-residents will be permitted for approved purposes only. Those are: maintaining critical infrastructure; providing essential services; providing health care; distributing medicine; delivering necessary supplies such as food, water, clothing, and fuel; the administration and governance of the Nation; or caring for a resident who is a close family member.

The bylaw applies to the following communities: Lac La Ronge Indian Reserve, Kitsaki Indian Reserve, Bigstone and Big Rocks, Potato River Indian Reserve, Little Hills Indian Reserves, Four Portages Indian Reserve, Fox Point, Sucker River Indian Reserve, Grandmother’s Bay Indian Reserve, Stanley Mission Indian Reserves, Morin Lake Indian Reserve, Little Red River Indian Reserves, Bittern Lake Indian Reserve and Old Fort Indian Reserve.

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March 30th 2020

BREAKING: Largest First Nation in Sask. enacts COVID-19 emergency measures

BREAKING: Largest First Nation in Sask. enacts COVID-19 emergency measures

by | Mar 31, 2020 | Worldwide Beach News & Updates

Lac La Ronge Indian Band (LLRIB) passed an emergency measures bylaw on Monday morning limiting access to their territory in north-central Saskatchewan.

Council of the Lac La Ronge Indian Band drafted the bylaw at a meeting held on March 26, in La Ronge, Sask., and passed it remotely by quorum on Monday.

Lac La Ronge Indian Band Chief Tammy Cook-Searson told National Observer on Friday that the measure was under consideration in order to ensure the health and safety of the community and combat the spread of COVID-19.

“Just to have the local people in the community that can go in and out but not people that don’t live in that community,” Cook-Searson said.

There are currently no confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Lac La Ronge and the community hopes to keep it that way.

“The potential spread of the novel coronavirus causing the disease COVID-19 requires urgent measures be taken to protect the health of residents of Lac La Ronge Indian Band reserves,” the bylaw states.

Lac La Ronge is located near the Town of La Ronge and the Northern Village of Air Ronge. LLRIB jurisdictions extend from central Saskatchewan north beyond Churchill River. It’s the largest First Nation in the province with a 2018 population of approximately 11,079.

Sign for the Lac La Ronge First Nation reserve located between the Town of La Ronge and the Northern Village of Air Ronge. Photograph by Michael Bramadat-Willcock.

Non-residents must request permission to access LLRIB territory with at least 24 hours notice and the band manager will then decide if the request is for an approved purpose before informing non-residents and security of their decision.

If a non-resident gives less than 24 hours notice of their intention to access the reserve, security will decide whether the visit equates to an approved purpose. If a visit is not approved, LLRIB security is instructed to remove them immediately.

Citing the Indian Act, Council made the decision “for the purpose of providing for the health of residents on the reserve and preventing the spreading of contagious and infectious diseases” and authorizes “removal and punishment of persons trespassing on the reserve or frequenting the reserve for prohibited purposes.”

“We are dealing with an invisible enemy and every Saskatchewan resident, First Nations and non-First Nation, must do everything necessary to protect everyone within our region”” FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron

The bylaw will remain in force until either Council repeals it or until “the province of Saskatchewan declares that physical (social) distancing is no longer a necessary or recommended measure to deal with the COVID-19 virus.”

Other First Nations in Saskatchewan have taken similar measures. Peter Ballantyne Cree Nation enacted a lockdown on March 21. Until further notice access is restricted in: Southend/Reindeer Lake, Pelican Narrows, Deschambeault Lake, Sandy Bay and Denare Beach. Travel has also been banned to the Fond Du Lac Denesuline Nation since March 20th.

A state of emergency was announced and travel restricted to Cumberland House Cree Nation and the Northern Village of Cumberland House on March 23, with only permanent residents allowed in.

On March 21, the Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) asked that Premier Scott Moe close provincial borders to stop the spread of COVID-19.

“The traffic on our highways coming in and out of the provincial borders continues to put everyone in Saskatchewan at unnecessary risk,” FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron said in a news release.

“We are dealing with an invisible enemy and every Saskatchewan resident, First Nations and non-First Nation, must do everything necessary to protect everyone within our region,” Cameron said.

The Northern Inter-Tribal Health Authority (NITHA) reported that one person diagnosed with COVID-19 in Southend has recovered, and as of March 28, there were no further reported cases of COVID-19 on First Nations reserves in the province.

Access to LLRIB reserves by non-residents will be permitted for approved purposes only. Those are: maintaining critical infrastructure; providing essential services; providing health care; distributing medicine; delivering necessary supplies such as food, water, clothing, and fuel; the administration and governance of the Nation; or caring for a resident who is a close family member.

The bylaw applies to the following communities: Lac La Ronge Indian Reserve, Kitsaki Indian Reserve, Bigstone and Big Rocks, Potato River Indian Reserve, Little Hills Indian Reserves, Four Portages Indian Reserve, Fox Point, Sucker River Indian Reserve, Grandmother’s Bay Indian Reserve, Stanley Mission Indian Reserves, Morin Lake Indian Reserve, Little Red River Indian Reserves, Bittern Lake Indian Reserve and Old Fort Indian Reserve.

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March 30th 2020

Hatton wins at Bay Hill; Els takes 1st senior title

Hatton wins at Bay Hill; Els takes 1st senior title

by | Mar 31, 2020 | Worldwide Beach News & Updates

AP
Published 8:22 p.m. ET March 8, 2020 | Updated 8:27 p.m. ET March 8, 2020

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Tyrrell Hatton went from losing his mind to winning the tournament.

Bay Hill served up the most demanding test this side of a major, and Hatton kept it together down the stretch Sunday by playing bogey-free over the last seven holes for a 2-over 74 to win the Arnold Palmer Invitational.

It was his fifth victory worldwide, and first on the PGA Tour, and it came in just his second start since returning from surgery on his right wrist during the offseason.

But the 28-year-old Englishman could only smile when he tapped in a 3-foot par putt on the 18th for a one-shot victory over Marc Leishman, one of the few players who kept moving forward — barely — on another day of blustery, brittle conditions at Bay Hill.

Hatton finished at 4-under 284, one of only four players who beat par for the week, the fewest at Bay Hill since 1980. So severe was the course that Matt Fitzpatrick closed with a 69, the only player to break 70 on the weekend.

Rory McIlroy, one shot behind going into the final round, had a 76 for his highest closing round in a PGA Tour-sanctioned event since a 76 in the 2013 U.S. Open at Merion. He still tied for fifth, his eighth consecutive finish in the top five worldwide dating to September.

Sungjae Im, trying to become the first player since David Duval in 1997 to win his first two PGA Tour titles in consecutive weeks, closed with a 73 to finish third.

The scoring average Sunday was 75.06, the toughest final round at Bay Hill since 1983. Hatton’s 284 was the highest score to win the Arnold Palmer Invitational since it began in 1979.

PGA TOUR CHAMPIONS

NEWPORT BEACH, Calif. (AP) — Ernie Els won the Hoag Classic for his first PGA Tour Champions title, birdieing par-5 15th and 18th holes for a two-stroke victory at Newport Beach Country Club.

Making his third senior start, the 50-year-old Hall of Famer from South Africa closed with a 4-under 67 to finish at 16-under 197. He opened with a 66 and shot 64 on Saturday.

Els lost a playoff to Miguel Angel Jimenez in his debut in the season-opening Mitsubishi Electric Championship in Hawaii, then tied for 34th last week in the Cologuard Classic in Arizona.

Fellow Hall of Famer Fred Couples, trying to win the event from the third time at age 60, finished with a 66 to tie for second with Glen Day and Robert Karlsson.

Couples, also part of the playoff in Hawaii, parred the final six holes, chunking a chip on 18 to squander a good birdie try.

Day birdied Nos. 14-17 to take the lead at 15 under, then bogeyed the 18th for a 64. Karlsson bogeyed the 16th and parred the last two in a 66.

EUROPEAN TOUR

DOHA, Qatar (AP) — Jorge Campillo lost a two-shot lead with three holes to play, stayed alive with two long birdie putts in a playoff and won on the fifth extra hole to beat David Drysdale in the Qatar Masters.

On the sixth time playing the 18th hole for the day, Campillo rolled in a 20-foot birdie putt and raised his arm. Victory was not assured until Drysdale’s 18-foot putt to extend the playoff missed to the left.

It looked like a certain victory when he stepped to the 16th hole, two shots clear of Jeff Winther and three ahead of Drysdale, the 44-year-old Scot still looking for his first European Tour victory. But he made bogey and then a double bogey, closed with a 1-over 72 and wound up in a playoff with Drysdale, who shot 71. They finished at 13-under 271.

Campillo made a 30-foot birdie and a 25-foot birdie in the first two playoff holes with Drysdale in tight. After they exchanged pars on the 18th twice, Campillo won it with his 20-footer.

OTHER TOURS

California native Trevor Simsby made a 4-foot birdie on the second playoff hole to win the Bandar Malaysia Open over Andrew Dodt and Jarin Todd. It was the first Asian Tour victory for Simsby, who earned his card through Asia’s developmental tour last year. … Brazil’s Alexandre Rocha won the PGA Tour Latinoamerica’s Estrella del Mar Open in Mazatlan, Mexico. He closed with a 10-under 62 for a 29-under 259 total and a three-shot victory. … Janie Jackson won the Florida’s Natural Charity Classic by eight strokes for her first Symetra Tour title. The former Alabama player closed with a 4-under 68 to finish at 10-under 206 at the Country Club of Winter Haven.

Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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‘Shark Tank’ recap: Mark Cuban’s sweet tooth bites into ice-cream treat

‘Shark Tank’ recap: Mark Cuban’s sweet tooth bites into ice-cream treat

by | Mar 30, 2020 | Worldwide Beach News & Updates

Matthew Wilson, Special to USA TODAY
Published 9:00 p.m. ET March 6, 2020 | Updated 9:23 p.m. ET March 6, 2020

CLOSE

After 10 seasons and 2,000 pitches, ‘Shark Tank’ sharks talk about the best, worst and funniest pitches they’ve heard.

USA TODAY

On Friday’s “Shark Tank,” a Los Angeles entrepreneur created a healthy alternative to the ice cream sandwich and gave shark Mark Cuban a sweet tooth in the process.

Francheska “Frankie” Yamsuan created Coconut Girl, a line of dairy-free, gluten-free ice cream sandwiches.  In flavors such as Beach Bum Maple, Aloha Chocolate and Hang Loose Vanilla, her ice cream is made with all natural ingredients like coconut milk, honey and dates. 

“I love summertime,” Yamsuan said. “There’s nothing better than relaxing by the beach with some creamy ice cream. But let’s be honest, these sweet treats don’t really help the waist line.”

The sharks were immediately hungry for Yamsuan’s product. Especially Cuban, who impatiently called to her, “Bring that over here.”

Ranked: ‘Shark Tank’ exclusive: The new list of the 20 best-selling products from the show

Asking for $180,000 for 18% of her company, Yamsuan entered the tank in need of help on the production side so she could get back to doing what she does best – selling her products. Yamsuan had problems with a co-packer and had been creating the ice cream by herself to fulfill orders. 

Born in the Philippines, Yamsuan always wanted to be an entrepreneur. When she was growing up, she watched her mother work two jobs to support the family. Yamsuan developed the ice cream and started selling it at events, fastening an ice box to a tricycle she rode  around. 

“When a grocery store approached me and asked if I did wholesale, I lied and said, ‘Yeah,’” Yamsuan said. 

Selling primarily at 30 Whole Foods stores (the frozen item is too costly to ship for online sales), the  company made a modest $120,000 in sales last year and was on track to make $300,000. 

“You know what Frankie, I’ve heard enough,” Cuban said. “I love healthy foods. It goes really, really well. I don’t even want to hear what these people have to say.”

Cuban agreed to give her the $180,000, but he wanted 25% of the company. He also didn’t want to wait for Yamsuan to listen to the other sharks. 

“I like the deal too. I’m your customer,” fellow shark Lori Greiner interjected. But Cuban insisted if Yamsuan listened to Greiner’s deal, he was out. 

“I’ll give you one last chance,” Cuban said.

Shark Kevin O’Leary decided to help Yamsuan in the negotiations with Cuban by undercutting him. He would give Yamsuan the $180,000 for a 20% stake: “I’ll squeeze Cuban’s head for you.”

“Only because he’s an idiot, OK, I will do 20%,” Cuban said, standing to accept the deal. 

Yamsuan agreed , and still hungry, he started chunking more ice cream sandwiches to the rest of the sharks.  

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Watch: Dolphin launches like a rocket near whale watchers

Watch: Dolphin launches like a rocket near whale watchers

by | Mar 30, 2020 | Worldwide Beach News & Updates

Whale watchers aboard a boat off Southern California received an unexpected dolphin show Wednesday when one from a pod of 60 launched like a rocket right next to the boat.

If not for passenger Joni Kilgore recording video at the time, the amazing height the dolphin reached would have been but a memory. Instead, she shared it with Newport Coastal Adventure, the whale-watching company out of Newport Beach which led the trip.

Also on FTW Outdoors: Watch an ice fisherman pull a 50-pound fish through a tiny hole

“The excited bottlenose dolphin jumped at least 20 feet in the air right next to our boat,” Jessica Roame told USA Today/For The Win Outdoors, adding that the dolphin “rocketed out of the water for fun, delighting our whale-watching passengers.”

Obvious from the video, the reaction of the whale watchers was delight and amazement.

“Bottlenose dolphin are among the most intelligent animals in the ocean, and to witness them behaving in this way is both wondrous and incredible,” Roame said.

The whale watchers also were treated to the sighting of a dolphin known as Patches; the photo below explains the nickname.

“His sighting is significant in Orange County because he is a very recognizable bottlenose dolphin with pink colored ‘patches’ all over his body,” Roame told For The Win Outdoors.

“These pink ‘patches’ are caused by a genetic abnormality called leucism, which gives it an unmistakable color pattern. He usually travels with a large group of conspecifics and has been reported all over the Southern California Bight, from the Mexican Border to the Santa Barbara Channel.

“The skin underneath appears pink because of the blood vessels of the animal showing through their non-pigmented skin.

“These marine mammals can be between 6-12-feet long and weigh close to 1,400 pounds when they’re fully grown, so it was a thrilling sight for all our passengers to witness.”

Highlighted, of course, by the high-flying dolphin.

Photos by Joni Kilgore and Delaney Trowbridge, who captured the closeup photo of the dolphin returning to the water.

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